Wednesday, January 09, 2008

Children Paintings As A Business

Parents who are running out of space on refrigerators and bulletin boards to showcase their children's artwork, but can't stand the thought of parting with their creations, have a new option for preserving their tots' masterpieces. Artimus Art publishes beautiful custom hardcover portfolios of children's artwork and hosts online galleries to share the images with select family and friends—or the whole world.

Part website, part publishing company, Artimus Art offers packages beginning at USD 155, which includes a 55-page book and 70 webhosted images. Customers receive a return postage-paid portfolio for sending in the artwork. Once pieces are scanned and uploaded, customers can begin organizing their images through a simple click-and-drag process on A template guides them to set details such as the font for the book’s cover. As soon as it's ready, the custom book—suitable for displaying on any coffee table or bookshelf—is delivered to the customer’s home. And online galleries never expire, so users can continue to browse and share images for years to come. There's even a public art gallery where aspiring Rembrandts and Monets can publish their work for the world to see.

Customers can also choose to have images converted to oil masterpieces, using a special canvas treatment, for just USD 99. Of course the potential merchandise that might be adorned with images of the artwork is endless. So, entrepreneurs thinking of duplicating and expanding on this concept should take note. Another obvious enhancement would be to let customers scan the art themselves and send it electronically, avoiding the hassle of shipping and alleviating any worries about precious originals getting lost in the mail. And, last but not least, don’t forget the art book and web portfolio market for artists who have long since put away their crayons and fingerpaints. ;-)

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